Last edited by Naramar
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

7 edition of Schooling among Nairobi slum residents in the wake of free primary education found in the catalog.

Schooling among Nairobi slum residents in the wake of free primary education

Schooling among Nairobi slum residents in the wake of free primary education

from border crossings to borderland

  • 134 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by African Population and Health Research Center in Nairobi, Kenya .
Written in English


About the Edition

Abstract: In the year 2003, the Kenyan government launched a Free Primary Education
policy, which propelled a notable increase in the country’s primary school
enrolment rates. The country’s capital city of Nairobi, however, lagged behind
most of the nation, with an enrolment rate of 62%, compared to a 104% gross
enrolment rate country-wide. Connections have been made between Nairobi’s
poor enrolment rates and the high proportion of children living in the city’s
informal settlements or slums. In this paper, therefore, we use a community
case-study approach to examine the experiences of one informal settlement
in Nairobi following the implementation of the free primary education policy.
Drawing on audio-taped, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions
with a range of community members and school personnel, and longitudinal
and demographic data, the paper thickly describes the aftermath of free
primary education in this urban poor context, and the reasons behind the
local popularity of cost-incurring, “informal” schools in the slums of Nairobi
among a low-income population, despite the introduction of free primary
education. Slum-based “informal” primary schools emerge as an underexplored
site of creativity in which parents, teachers, and administrators
attempt to bridge implementation gaps between educational policy and local
realities among the urban poor in Nairobi, Kenya. The paper employs an
emic perspective for understanding the dynamics of formal school enrolment
among the urban poor, and for exploring informal schools as a potential space
of empowerment for slum residents.

Edition Notes

StatementChi-chi Undie ... [et al.].
SeriesAPHRC working papers -- no. 36
ContributionsUndie, Chi-Chi.
The Physical Object
Pagination23 p. :
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16930099M
LC Control Number2008349654

Free primary education (FPE) is widely assumed to be required to ensure that the poor gain enrolment. After the introduction of FPE (from January ) in Kenyan schools, huge increases in enrolment were officially reported. However, our research, conducted 10 months after the introduction of FPE in and around the informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi, suggests a less beneficial by: Free Primary Education. The Government introduced Free Primary Education in By then it planned for Kenya to realize Universal Primary Education (UPE) by the year and Education For All by the year in line with United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) agreed in the year

• Primary education is not of sufficient quality to ensure that all children can learn the basics. Among young men aged years who had left school after six years of schooling, 6% were illiterate and 26% were semi-literate. The figures are even worse for young women, with 9% illiterate and 30%File Size: KB. Chinese companies boost education infrastructure in a Kenyan slum and every child will get an access to a book for smooth learning. among others. However, education is the major eye opener.

“I had to make good use of the money I got from the Free Primary Education programme. “When I joined the school, it had 1, pupils, and most of them lived in the informal settlements of : Lydiah Nyawira. Nairobi Primary School - Mamlaka Road, Westlands, Nairobi, Mamlaka Road - Rated based on 48 Reviews "Great school. great place to start life."/5(48).


Share this book
You might also like
Edinburgh & East Lothian Archaeology Conference, Saturday 7th September 2002 ... Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh.

Edinburgh & East Lothian Archaeology Conference, Saturday 7th September 2002 ... Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh.

Banfield Transitway Project

Banfield Transitway Project

Thomas Guide 2000 Alameda and Contra Costa

Thomas Guide 2000 Alameda and Contra Costa

U.S. Custom House Guide 2006 (Us Custom House Guide)

U.S. Custom House Guide 2006 (Us Custom House Guide)

Britain in the thirties.

Britain in the thirties.

petrography of selected limestones of the McMillan formation from the Trenton Quadrangle, Butler County, Ohio

petrography of selected limestones of the McMillan formation from the Trenton Quadrangle, Butler County, Ohio

New City Library, opened by H.R.H. Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent, 22 October, 1965.

New City Library, opened by H.R.H. Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent, 22 October, 1965.

Monotheism

Monotheism

People of the Black Sun

People of the Black Sun

The Great Brain reforms

The Great Brain reforms

Fulton County, Georgia marriage records, 1854-1902

Fulton County, Georgia marriage records, 1854-1902

Prejudice in social studies textbooks

Prejudice in social studies textbooks

Schooling among Nairobi slum residents in the wake of free primary education Download PDF EPUB FB2

Families in Kibera slum, Nairobi, were given two weeks before their houses, shops and schools were demolished by bulldozers at the end of July to make way for a $20 million new dual-carriageway. The demolition plan included the following schools, with the following numbers of pupils, about to take their end-of-term exams.

Egesa Children Centre. A study in Nairobi put the transition rate from primary to secondary school in slum schools at 46%. The primary school completion among slum children stood at 76%.

The primary school. Even after the introduction of free primary education inthe results still show that there is a marked difference between urban slum and non-slum areas.

Previous work done comparing mainly health outcomes of the slum population and rural population has shown that the slum population depicts poorer health outcomes (APHRC, ).Cited by: Explaining school dropout among the urban poor in Nairobi Benta Abuya, Moses Oketch & Peter Musyoka To cite this article: Benta Abuya, Moses Oketch & Peter Musyoka () Why do pupils dropout when education is ‘free’.

Explaining school dropout among the urban poor in Nairobi, Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education.

The free primary education policy has led to a significant increase in primary school enrollment in the country, from million children in to million in Schooling among Nairobi Slum Residents in the wake of Free Perhaps Nairobius performance in regard to FPE should not have been unforeseen.

primary schools, in the course of our analysis, we identified four major [Filename: Working Paper - pdf] - Read File Online - Report Abuse. In the slums, alcohol and sex are cheaper than food and the effects on children find their way to neighbouring schools.

For more than 25 years teaching in the heart of Kibera, a large slum. The education may be free but the there is very little value that is added in many of those schools. It beats reason why a government would be investing such large sums and yet not focus on what.

Huchzermeyer, M. Slum Upgrading in Nairobi within the Housing and Basic Services Market: A Housing Rights Concern. Journal of Asian and African Studies (1, ). BBC Kenya Begins Huge Slum Clearance. BBC. (Septem ). How Insecurity Impacts on School Attendance and School Dropout among Urban Slum Children in Nairobi I started schooling at St.

Eliz abeth Primar y School. at time my schooling was consi stent and. Primary education. Primary education in Kenya begins at the age of 5 to 7 after completion of a year of kindergarten commonly known as Nursery School or pre-unit. The first class or year of primary school is known as Standard 1, the final year as Standard 8 and primary school children are known as pupils.

The Role of Free Education in Kenya Education has a long history of significance in Kenya. Before the nation achieved independence, access to education was extremely limited under colonial rule.3 While primary education was a requirement for all British children, very few Kenyans had the 1 Oketch, Moses O., and Caine M.

Rolleston. Policies of. Kenya's free primary and secondary education policies don't benefit the Kenya’s free education policy could actually be deepening inequality Children walk home from school in a. About Nairobi Slum Schools Project Trust.

The mission of the NSSPT is simply to help improve the prospects for the children within the slums by providing sustained educational facilities, essential healthcare, and where possible a little bit of More».

Pages in category "Education in Nairobi" The following 38 pages are in this category, out of 38 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

Access to and Exclusion from Primary Education in Slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh 1. Introduction Bangladesh is still a predominantly rural country, but its urban population is rising fast. Some 12 million people live in the capital, Dhaka1, a number that is projected to grow to.

A survey of slum residents in Nairobi, Kenya, reveals that the majority cannot afford any of the motorized transport options in the city.

They cope by limiting their travel outside their settlement and, if they do travel, by often 'choosing' to walk. As compared to the non-poor, poor households are systematically worse off.

basic education programmes despite the introduction of free primary and secondary education by the government as many children are still out of school. The enrolment of NFE increased f in topupils inan increase of percent.

Evidence suggests that more than half of primary school students in Nairobi attend private schools. This is despite the fact that 15 years ago the government implemented a free primary education.

The main focus of the study was to investigate the impact of Free Primary Education in public primary schools since its inception in The specific objectives of the study were to find out the extent teacher pupil ratio influences academic performance, establish the challenges in school administration, assess the influence of physical facilities and determine the relationship between the.

Pupils at Farasi Lane Primary School in Nairobi during a function on Octo According to the Institute of Economic Affairs, even with the introduction of free education inthe. In Mathare, Nairobi’s second largest slum, informal schools act as centres for child protection. Children from three to 13 years-old benefit from the work of volunteers trying to provide them a classroom where learning primary education, a meal a day,s and a bathroom more or less stable.This study sought to determine effect of mother’s education on child nutritional status of children living in slum settings.

Methods: Data are from a maternal and child health project nested within the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (NUHDSS). The .